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 TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT 

USE-INSPIRED ENGINEERING 

PROTEINS

GENOMES

BASIC SCIENCE

Impact of protein domains on chromatin states

Gene essentiality maps of phage genomes 

Sequence determination of efflux transporter

Molecular rules of protein allostery

ORACLE: Bacteriophage engineering

SENSORSEQ: Allosteric protein

PROD-ATAC: Genome-wide chromatin changes

PHAGE PACK: Effects of host genes on phage fitness

Biosensors for new molecules

Efflux transporter for bioenergy applications

Engineered bacteriophages to combat multiday resistance

Engineered chaperones to combat misplatia

UNDERSTANDING SEQUENCE-FUNCTION RELATIONSHIPS

Oracle

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

Fig6-nograph-2048x627_edited.jpg

ORACLE: Bacteriophage engineering

Our goal is to understand the functional impact of variants in disease-relevant human genes using deep phenotyping measurements. Functional genomic studies to characterize cellular and clinical consequences of genetic variants lags far behind the pace of genome sequencing. Only a very small fraction of the millions of currently cataloged missense mutations in the human genome has functional annotation. Using deep phenotyping assays, we aim to measure the cellular impacts of mutations in these genes and to cluster mutants based on transcriptional dysregulation. These studies are intended to enable patient-specific drug targeting

SensorSeq
bacteriophage-host.png

SENSORSEQ: Allosteric Protein

Our goal is to understand the functional impact of variants in disease-relevant human genes using deep phenotyping measurements. Functional genomic studies to characterize cellular and clinical consequences of genetic variants lags far behind the pace of genome sequencing. Only a very small fraction of the millions of currently cataloged missense mutations in the human genome has functional annotation. Using deep phenotyping assays, we aim to measure the cellular impacts of mutations in these genes and to cluster mutants based on transcriptional dysregulation. These studies are intended to enable patient-specific drug targeting

Fig6-nograph-2048x627_edited.jpg

ORACLE: Bacteriophage engineering

Our goal is to understand the functional impact of variants in disease-relevant human genes using deep phenotyping measurements. Functional genomic studies to characterize cellular and clinical consequences of genetic variants lags far behind the pace of genome sequencing. Only a very small fraction of the millions of currently cataloged missense mutations in the human genome has functional annotation. Using deep phenotyping assays, we aim to measure the cellular impacts of mutations in these genes and to cluster mutants based on transcriptional dysregulation. These studies are intended to enable patient-specific drug targeting

USED-INSPIRED ENGINEERING

ramanphage150_edited.jpg

ORACLE: Bacteriophage engineering

Our goal is to understand the functional impact of variants in disease-relevant human genes using deep phenotyping measurements. Functional genomic studies to characterize cellular and clinical consequences of genetic variants lags far behind the pace of genome sequencing. Only a very small fraction of the millions of currently cataloged missense mutations in the human genome has functional annotation. Using deep phenotyping assays, we aim to measure the cellular impacts of mutations in these genes and to cluster mutants based on transcriptional dysregulation. These studies are intended to enable patient-specific drug targeting

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